Category: Technical

Mapping Historical Regional Voting Patterns of Zambia Presidential Election Results

More maps! This time around, we have generated historical maps for regional presidential election results. We think this provides a better understanding of regional voting patterns over the years. For each of the presidential elections held between 1991 and 2016, we visualise the final regional (READ: provincial) outcomes and, additionally, results by electoral administrative boundaries (READ: constituencies). (more…)

Mapping the Zambia 2016 Presidential Election Results

We finally got our hands on the most recent Shapefiles [1]. Also, a few weeks back, we got our hands on the official Electoral Commission of Zambia presidential election results [2] and did some really basic analysis. So we decided to visualise the results. No commentary here, just maps… and more maps. (more…)

Student Programming Plagiarism Dectection Using Moss

Cheating in student programming tasks manifests in various forms; sharing the same piece of code is one such way. While there are a number of ways of detecting source code similarity, using Moss (Measure of Software Similarity) [1]—a plagiarism detection SaaS system—is one potentially viable and effective method of doing so. It is “fast, easy to use, and free” [1, 2]. (more…)

Historical Regional Voting Pattern in Past Zambia Presidential Elections

Wanting to do something ‘worthwhile’ while procrastinating—no pun intended, I dug into the past six—1991, 1996, 2001, 2006, 2008 and 2011—Zambian presidential election results [1], collated the data and then mapped regional (district-level) results, just as I did in for the 2011 results [2]. I thought it was funny that back in 1991,  Kenneth Kaunda ONLY had majority votes in Eastern Province.

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Public Rant – STOP Creating PDF Documents With Empty Metadata Fields

Creating PDF documents with empty metadata fields is bad form… if you are one one of those perpetuating this vile practice, PLEASE STOP IT!. First off, there is a very good reason why those PDF document metadata fields are there—for the most part, it helps search engines like ‘The Google’ to appropriately index and structure your document [1, 2]; in addition though, that meta information provides potential users of your documents the chance to quickly get a sense of what the document is about. (more…)